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Squat Is Quite A Bit Better Than Deadlift
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MatthewMovement
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Join date: Dec 2012
Posts: 23

I don't have a video from my most recently lifting, some of these numbers have gone up.

My squat is more like 435, deadlift is still around 395-400, bench is 245.

But I'm not sure why my squat is higher than my deadlift.

When I see raw lifters doing Squats and Deads, normally their deadlift is quite a bit higher than their deadlift.

What am I doing wrong?




I know it's not the worst thing in the world, but I would like to get my deadlift numbers higher.

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black_angus1
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Join date: May 2009
Posts: 836

Your squat is a tiny bit high (1/2" or so) and your deadlift form looks like shit. Look at really good deadlifters, study their form. Your lock your knees really early in the pull, forcing your weight in front of the bar. I would also suggest bringing your deadlift grip in.


Other than that, maybe you're just a good squatter. That's not a bad thing. Don't worry about what other people do; a total is a total.

EDIT: And why the hell aren't you using chalk? Just having a better grip on the bar might put 25lb or more on your pull right away. I know I couldn't come close to my PR without chalk and baby powder.

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tattoo'd'popeye
Level 2

Join date: Sep 2006
Posts: 586

Totally agree with angus1,

When you fix your deadlift, not only will your dead numbers go up but you will be surprised at what it does for your bench and squat numbers. I did notice your hamstrings are a weak point. Where in Missouri are you? I may be able to help if Im close by. Great work so far dude.

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Mathew Bertrand
Contributor

Join date: Feb 2005
Posts: 632

Hey man, I like your lifts, good work.

First of all... you're wearing knee wraps, so that's one reason why you're squat is above your deadlift, when I used to use them I'd get 50-70lbs out of them.

Second, your squat form is awesome, your knees go very far forward and you stay nice and upright, it was a pleasure to watch.

3rd, you seem to have a fairly long torso, and not the longest arms, that makes deadlifting a total nightmare, I'm in the same boat. Fortunately, somehow your legs are also long. How tall are you and what inseam are your pants?

4th, your deadlift form is off, Black angus gave every good advice there. Something I'd highly recommend is 5 sets of 3 at 80% of your max, and pull it to your knees, yes your knees. This will really teach you to drive with your legs. Follow this up with pulls from the knees, preferably off boxes for 5 sets of 3 with 90% of your deadlift max. add 10lbs to each lift for a month. This would go a long long way to build your form. I don't recomend bringing in your grip, as it seems like your legs are in the way, but do the best you can.

Good lifting dude, and good on you for reaching out for help. And don't mind black angus, his heart is in the right place, he's just an angry man, lol.

Let me know if you have any questions

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MatthewMovement
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Join date: Dec 2012
Posts: 23

My gym gets kinda pissy about us bringing chalk in. I used to be a climber though, so I do have chalk.

I don't feel like my grip is what's getting me though (but, I'm sure it will help).

I have actually widened my stance on my squats and gotten quite a bit more weight out of it and I've switched to sumo deadlifts. I haven't maxed out on them, but I did pull 335x10 in a sumo earlier this week and it didn't seem too bad.



Also, are you sure it's my hamstrings?
One of my friends is a power lifter, he deadlifts much more than I do, but our squat numbers are just about the same. But he can leg press a hell of a lot more than me. He thought that my hammys must be strong and I have weak quads.

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tattoo'd'popeye
Level 2

Join date: Sep 2006
Posts: 586

Try not to compare you numbers to others when trying to access your own weak spots. If you noticed in the video on you last couple ME squats your knees started to wobble? Thats generally caused by your hams failing and your quads trying to take over. This is confirmed when I watched you deadlift. Your butt is up, knees lock out very early and your purely using your back grind the weight up to lock out. When I looked at your failed attempt you had no problem getting the bar off the ground, you lost it about the time your hams and glutes should have fired forcing the pelvis forward and the lift up.

GLute/Hams raises, learn to love them 3X a week. Try to work up to 3x10 with added weight.

Larry set you in the right direction and could probably explain what I was saying way better than I could. I may try and hire Larry as my coach!

Keep it up man, you will get there!

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Mathew Bertrand
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Join date: Feb 2005
Posts: 632

tattoo'd'popeye wrote:
Try not to compare you numbers to others when trying to access your own weak spots. If you noticed in the video on you last couple ME squats your knees started to wobble? Thats generally caused by your hams failing and your quads trying to take over. This is confirmed when I watched you deadlift. Your butt is up, knees lock out very early and your purely using your back grind the weight up to lock out. When I looked at your failed attempt you had no problem getting the bar off the ground, you lost it about the time your hams and glutes should have fired forcing the pelvis forward and the lift up.

GLute/Hams raises, learn to love them 3X a week. Try to work up to 3x10 with added weight.

Larry set you in the right direction and could probably explain what I was saying way better than I could. I may try and hire Larry as my coach!

Keep it up man, you will get there!



Hey man, just start a thread and ask for help, you'll have me as a coach then, and I promise I'll be there for every update

Also I concur about the hamstrings, gh raise would really bring that up. And for form, I'd just start with pulls to the knees, and block deadlifts, they work wonders.

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Mathew Bertrand
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Join date: Feb 2005
Posts: 632

MatthewMovement wrote:
My gym gets kinda pissy about us bringing chalk in. I used to be a climber though, so I do have chalk.

I don't feel like my grip is what's getting me though (but, I'm sure it will help).

I have actually widened my stance on my squats and gotten quite a bit more weight out of it and I've switched to sumo deadlifts. I haven't maxed out on them, but I did pull 335x10 in a sumo earlier this week and it didn't seem too bad.



Also, are you sure it's my hamstrings?
One of my friends is a power lifter, he deadlifts much more than I do, but our squat numbers are just about the same. But he can leg press a hell of a lot more than me. He thought that my hammys must be strong and I have weak quads.


Hey man, I strongly feel it's just your proportions that causing the discrepency, he probably has very long legs, and you seem to the apposite.

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MatthewMovement
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Join date: Dec 2012
Posts: 23

Okay. I forgot to answer, I'm 6'1" and my inseam is 33".

We don't really have access to a good Glute/Ham machine in my gym. I used to do them all the time though.

Thanks for your advice guys!

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Mathew Bertrand
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Join date: Feb 2005
Posts: 632

hyperextensions are a great substitute, just the the weight behind your head if it gets easy.

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tattoo'd'popeye
Level 2

Join date: Sep 2006
Posts: 586

heres a substitute as well. My gym didn't have one for the longest time, I personally found a used one and bought it for my gym. Is funny to watch people use it. They do everything on it except for glute ham raises.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-f96dmIz8zo

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MatthewMovement
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Join date: Dec 2012
Posts: 23

tattoo'd'popeye wrote:
heres a substitute as well. My gym didn't have one for the longest time, I personally found a used one and bought it for my gym. Is funny to watch people use it. They do everything on it except for glute ham raises.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=-f96dmIz8zo



We have those! I'll get them into my routine. What about good mornings?

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Mathew Bertrand
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Join date: Feb 2005
Posts: 632

sweet set up man

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MatthewMovement
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Join date: Dec 2012
Posts: 23

I do SLDL for my hamstrings already as well as hamstring curls. Should I replace those with GHR? or just add it?

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tattoo'd'popeye
Level 2

Join date: Sep 2006
Posts: 586

add it, more ham work the better

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Mathew Bertrand
Contributor

Join date: Feb 2005
Posts: 632

I'd leave the stiff legs for deadlift days, and just focus on gh raise and good mornings after you squat. I find the shearing force of stiff legs to just be a little much compared to some easier and just as effective options.

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cubuff2028
Level 1

Join date: Jan 2006
Posts: 255

black_angus1 wrote:
Your squat is a tiny bit high (1/2" or so) and your deadlift form looks like shit. Look at really good deadlifters, study their form. Your lock your knees really early in the pull, forcing your weight in front of the bar. I would also suggest bringing your deadlift grip in.


Other than that, maybe you're just a good squatter. That's not a bad thing. Don't worry about what other people do; a total is a total.

EDIT: And why the hell aren't you using chalk? Just having a better grip on the bar might put 25lb or more on your pull right away. I know I couldn't come close to my PR without chalk and baby powder.


He's right. You're short-cutting the depth on the squat. This inflates your squat poundage. Your deadlift form looks like mine--inefficient. Pull closer to your body. Imagine the path of the bar angling up towards you, rather than straight up. It will also help to warm up with glute activation drills. Then make a point of flexing your glutes prior initiating the deadlift pull.

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