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Becoming a PT?
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maxysilva1
Level

Join date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1

Hi Guys,

This is my fist post on the forum, been reading round for years! recently decided to start getting involved! I didn't really know where to post this but anyhow...

Becoming a PT in UK. course starts in June! went to uni but wasn't for me does anyone have any tips advice on being a pt? anyone here already doing it? I know its a bit of a broad Q! just thought i would ask as this seems to be the most forward thinking informative place i could think of?

thanks!

sorry if this is in the wrong forum!!

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Field
Level

Join date: Oct 2011
Posts: 529

I dont know about if your wanting to start your own business from the get go or work at a commercial gym for a while but some kind of education credentials will make you more attractive to employers and/or intelligent clients.

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killerDIRK
Level

Join date: Apr 2011
Posts: 725

Field wrote:
I dont know about if your wanting to start your own business from the get go or work at a commercial gym for a while but some kind of eduction credentials will make you more attractive to employers and/or intelligent clients.
X2 !

Also, do as much reading as your brain can possibly eat. Books like Supertraining are "THICK" but worth your time as well as the russian manuals, 5/3/1 by Wendler...on and on. BE the smartest motherfucker out there...

I lift in a commercial SPA with trainers on staff but even though I am NOT certified as I write this I still have people asking me to help with their form, programming and other excercise questions...The reason for this is I live the life and do not pay lip service to it...

I really hope the PT stood for Personal Trainer and not Physical Therapist. Actually I am a certified
Massage and STretch therapist and work for America's premier running team, the Mammoth Track Club.

Hope that this helps in some way and shoot me a PM if need be...killer D

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louiek
Level

Join date: Nov 2011
Posts: 639

If PT = personal trainer, then you're going to be working mostly with older individuals who want to lose weight and/or have no fucking clue about anything. I'm a PT. All I do is run people through effective, compound oriented workouts, then I make them do some rehab work for their bad posture.

I have 3 templates I work through using box squats, goblet squats, benching/pressing/rowing, and then some explosive/hypertrophy hybrid stuff: kroc rows, push press, squat jump, etc. For cardio, I introduce interval training. Generally I won't go below 5 reps, and I rarely go above 12. But don't overload them with too much. I like to just write down the shit we do as we do it, then at the end of the workout I'll give it to them. Then they can do the workout over again. The information you give them probably won't sink in. They've got other shit to worry about in their lives, so don't expect them to take each training session as a learning experience. Correct their form, tell them what it does, and you're fine. Sometimes they like hearing about it, but it's rare they'll actually take it to heart. What they really want is to pay someone to do it for them, and to do it correctly.

The most important thing is to fix their horrible squat form, and box squats for 8-10 reps for a few weeks help (though if you can 300-500 reps total would be a better goal). They all have horrible squat form, so learn how to coach a squat if you don't already. Make sure you don't lie to them or start acting how a "personal trainer" should act. I don't hide the fact I train powerlifting/strongman. I've read Supertraining (and dozens of other shit about athletic development. never stop reading) and I train on a strongman modified Westside template. People want someone who's smart and make them make progress. They don't want Timmy the Personal Trainer (Jim Wendler reference). Don't use machines unless you get someone with an injury or someone who you know will feel embarrassed using the free weights with a bunch of dudes. Use the Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) scale as a gauge whenever possible, but watch their form and decide what number they're actually at. Be aware they have no idea what heavy weights feel like. They might tell you it feels like a 8/10, but then they'll hit 10 reps without even squinting. They're just not used to feeling heavy weight and don't know how to handle the pressure.

It's not a hard job as long as you generally enjoy lifting and helping people.

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caveman101
Level 2

Join date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3469

louiek wrote:
If PT = personal trainer, then you're going to be working mostly with older individuals who want to lose weight and/or have no fucking clue about anything. I'm a PT. All I do is run people through effective, compound oriented workouts, then I make them do some rehab work for their bad posture.

I have 3 templates I work through using box squats, goblet squats, benching/pressing/rowing, and then some explosive/hypertrophy hybrid stuff: kroc rows, push press, squat jump, etc. For cardio, I introduce interval training. Generally I won't go below 5 reps, and I rarely go above 12. But don't overload them with too much. I like to just write down the shit we do as we do it, then at the end of the workout I'll give it to them. Then they can do the workout over again. The information you give them probably won't sink in. They've got other shit to worry about in their lives, so don't expect them to take each training session as a learning experience. Correct their form, tell them what it does, and you're fine. Sometimes they like hearing about it, but it's rare they'll actually take it to heart. What they really want is to pay someone to do it for them, and to do it correctly.

The most important thing is to fix their horrible squat form, and box squats for 8-10 reps for a few weeks help (though if you can 300-500 reps total would be a better goal). They all have horrible squat form, so learn how to coach a squat if you don't already. Make sure you don't lie to them or start acting how a "personal trainer" should act. I don't hide the fact I train powerlifting/strongman. I've read Supertraining (and dozens of other shit about athletic development. never stop reading) and I train on a strongman modified Westside template. People want someone who's smart and make them make progress. They don't want Timmy the Personal Trainer (Jim Wendler reference). Don't use machines unless you get someone with an injury or someone who you know will feel embarrassed using the free weights with a bunch of dudes. Use the Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) scale as a gauge whenever possible, but watch their form and decide what number they're actually at. Be aware they have no idea what heavy weights feel like. They might tell you it feels like a 8/10, but then they'll hit 10 reps without even squinting. They're just not used to feeling heavy weight and don't know how to handle the pressure.

It's not a hard job as long as you generally enjoy lifting and helping people.


Excellent post. especially the last paragraph

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adh
Level

Join date: Jan 2009
Posts: 139

If you are serious about becoming a PT, please make sure that you look like you work out, there's a few PT's in my gym and a couple of them are just slobs and have people doing bizarre exercises, don't get me wrong i'm sure they know what there doing, the majority of the time anyway, but i'd only have a PT session with someone who looks like they know what there doing, good luck anyway man.

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teekz
Level

Join date: Jan 2004
Posts: 54

Though I agree with the reading as much as possible statement, I would say Supertraining may be a bit too intense to start with, That book is Uber dense and not an easy read.

get these 5 books and read them front to back

1: Get Buffed - Ian King, great book King was on of the first I heard speak about creating a balanced approach to your training programs.

2: Modern Trends by Charles Poliquin. Another classic, Poliquin didn't hold back in this must have text. He goes over advanced program design- really changed how I approached strength training

3: The Elite Trainer by JP Catanzaro - Awesome Book! Has everything from how to design a program, sets, reps etc. Also includes tons of programs and exercise demos. So glad I found this gem

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killerDIRK
Level

Join date: Apr 2011
Posts: 725

TEEKZ. Agree with your Supertraining comment, taken with a grain of salt since you tell us to get these FIVE books, but then only list THREE . . . LOL ; )

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iStandOnMyHands
Level

Join date: Apr 2012
Posts: 79

adh wrote:
If you are serious about becoming a PT, please make sure that you look like you work out, there's a few PT's in my gym and a couple of them are just slobs and have people doing bizarre exercises, don't get me wrong i'm sure they know what there doing, the majority of the time anyway, but i'd only have a PT session with someone who looks like they know what there doing, good luck anyway man.


some of the best trainers i know arent in great shape. just look at mark rippetoe. im a PT, and im tiny compared to some. but i still get business.
as long as you dont look really unhealthy, youre fine. some people actually prefer me as a smaller and younger person because theyre intimidated by the larger and older guys. that being said, im throwing on about 20 lbs of muscle by the end of the summer :D
being a PT is a really fun job if you like to lift and talk to people. its also easy, if you know what youre doing. just familiarize yourself with common injuries/restrictions cause you'll have to work around a lot of them.

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teekz
Level

Join date: Jan 2004
Posts: 54

LOL okay 2 more must reads... Kendal's Muscle testing and function. Really gave me an understanding of all of the corrective training programs and how to spot a injury waiting to happen.

And...

Influence by Robert Cialdini (sp) not a training book, but will help you understand people and how to increase sales in your business

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