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Weighted Pushups
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stone89
Level 1

Join date: Aug 2006
Posts: 20

Are weighted push ups a valid substitute, for endurance, strength, and power? Is it safe to put weight on your back? I'm up to point where i can do 135 pounds on my back 8 times...is that safe? is it ok? i feels great on my shoulders compared to benching but is it possible to make the same gains?

Thanks for your time.

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Airtruth
Level 1

Join date: Feb 2007
Posts: 4323

moving weight is moving weight.

Don't over think the situation, i'm sure your body looks alot better and feels stonger than when you could do 10lbs on your back.

If something is painful you will feel it. If something feels great you will know.

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1morerep
Level 4

Join date: Jan 2007
Posts: 799

actually there are 2 kinds of moving weight and they are quite different. there are closed-chain movements meaning the body itself moves against the resistance as in a push up and open-chain movements like a bench press where the body remains stationary and the restistance moves.

it's been said that closed-chain movements are superior to open chain ones. so this suggests that push ups are superior to bench presses, pull ups are superior to pull downs and squats superior to leg presses. but of course the weighted push up is just too troublesome amd impractical to use with very heavy weight for obvious reasons. but they do come in handy when super setting.

after a set of heavy dumbbell flys or cable crossovers, immediately go into a set of weighted pushups. believe me you wont need much weight to reap the benefits.

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benmoore
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Join date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1013

Weighted dips perhaps?

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StevenF
Level 4

Join date: Feb 2003
Posts: 4393

1morerep I think I'm going to have to try that, good suggestion.

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Tulkastaldo
Level 2

Join date: Sep 2006
Posts: 293

A weighted pushup compared to bench seems to be kind of like a leg press compared to a squat, there isn't as much body stabilization involved in doing a weighted pushup, or, I should say, there is a different kind of stabilization and to a lesser degree. How do you throw that much weight on your back? just a backpack with three 45 lb. plates in it or what?

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1morerep
Level 4

Join date: Jan 2007
Posts: 799

weighted dips are fantastic. again closed chain - body moving agaist resistance. and thanks StevenF..yes give it a try. you will not believe the pump you get.

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tonyc
Level 2

Join date: Sep 2007
Posts: 92

the best and safest way to put weight on yourself would be a weight vest, however they can be quite expensive. I haven't heard of any other safe ways to stack weight on yourself. One thing I might add is to remember to do your push-ups using dumbbells as it'll make it easier on the wrists and you'll get a better contraction.

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1morerep
Level 4

Join date: Jan 2007
Posts: 799

Tulkastaldo wrote:
A weighted pushup compared to bench seems to be kind of like a leg press compared to a squat, there isn't as much body stabilization involved in doing a weighted pushup, or, I should say, there is a different kind of stabilization and to a lesser degree. How do you throw that much weight on your back? just a backpack with three 45 lb. plates in it or what?


well that's what i meant...it isn't practical. but if used in a super set where you're per-exhausting your chest with a fly movement, you don't need a lot of weight on your back to reach failure. and you could always get a hot girl to sit on your back!

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USNS physique
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Join date: May 2005
Posts: 162

My chest and triceps blow up like crazy when I do push ups, BUT...it's all pump and no substance. You have some 'body weight only' routines out there but look at the guys who do them- not too good of an endorsement (dont say matt furey because he was a power lifter before he made up hos crazy system). You can try doing these push ups for a while but you'll soon hit a maintenance level that you can't move beyond...well...because it's just push ups.

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grrrsauce
Level 3

Join date: Oct 2006
Posts: 270

I think they are actually very good. As mentioned they are open-chain which allows the serratus anterior to get involved because the shoulder blades are allowed to move. This can be good if you experience winging or have any imbalances with your shoulders.

If you have a work out partner just have him load the plates on your back and balance them while you push. We have safely done 4 plates and are thinking of rigging a sled with padding or something and shoulder straps so we can go heavier and not have plates sliding all over the place.

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Ryan P. McCarter
Level 4

Join date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2537

I like them a lot, and there is a much greater stabilization component to them, contrary to what somebody said earlier.

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Malevolence
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Join date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1213

The only thing I would be concerned about is your joints, particularly your wrist. But I don't know enough about the subject of weighted push-ups to know whether that is a valid concern. Save to say, that is the one thing that pops to mind.

For instance, I can do ~100 pushups unweighted, but afterward I feel like I just put a very excessive and probably dangerous stress on my wrists. So I use push-up bars(fancy way of saying, my dumbbells) or I do them on my knuckles. I can't do quite as many this way, but it feels a lot more natural of a movement?

I've tried doing weighted push-ups in the past, but I could never figure out a good way to do them really. I don't have a weight vest or anything like that, so I just tried putting a bunch of 10s in a backpack, strapping the pack on really tight and going at it. It worked for a few reps, but then the weight started to slip around and it again felt like injury territory.

I couldn't fit 45s in the backpack, and I didn't have any 25s at this time... or a hot girl laying around... oops.


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UkpairehMombooto
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Join date: Sep 2007
Posts: 412

I sincerely hope you're joking. A weighted pushup would involve a lot more stabilization. A weighted pushup is the equivalent oif a weighted dip and squat. Trouble is its very difficult to hold trhe weight on your back, and you can end up damaging soft tissue.

Tulkastaldo wrote:
A weighted pushup compared to bench seems to be kind of like a leg press compared to a squat, there isn't as much body stabilization involved in doing a weighted pushup, or, I should say, there is a different kind of stabilization and to a lesser degree. How do you throw that much weight on your back? just a backpack with three 45 lb. plates in it or what?


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Tulkastaldo
Level 2

Join date: Sep 2006
Posts: 293

u_mombooto wrote:
I sincerely hope you're joking. A weighted pushup would involve a lot more stabilization.


not at all. The weighted pushup might involve core stabilization and such, much like the normal pushup, but in the bench press the weight is applied to the wrists, forcing stabilization of deltoids, pecs and triceps in order to keep the weight from crushing you.(or the weight sliding off if you're one of those people who don't use clips)

In the pushup, regardless of how much weight you use, you have a nice solid floor to push against,and your back to stabilize the weight. The stabilization comes then from the proximal end of your arms because the weight is behind you instead of in your hands. The support of the weight is more evenly distributed and therefore less intense.

While you equate the pushup with a squat, I've never felt it in my quads when doing pushups with 100 lbs. in a backpack, (unless you count the process of standing up afterwards.)

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bealedozer
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Join date: Apr 2007
Posts: 420

Moving weight is moving weight my friend.

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Grimnuruk
Level 4

Join date: Feb 2005
Posts: 513

try bands


http://www.T-Nation.com/...1426252&cr=

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gswork
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Join date: Jul 2007
Posts: 646

I'd be interested in any other ways people have added weight without risking injury on this movement.

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grrrsauce
Level 3

Join date: Oct 2006
Posts: 270

gswork wrote:
I'd be interested in any other ways people have added weight without risking injury on this movement.


If me and my friend get that sled rigged I will let you know how we did it.

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1morerep
Level 4

Join date: Jan 2007
Posts: 799

bealedozer wrote:
Moving weight is moving weight my friend.


as i said earlier...not true. open chain and closed chain movements..big difference!

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gswork
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Join date: Jul 2007
Posts: 646

1morerep wrote:
bealedozer wrote:
Moving weight is moving weight my friend.

as i said earlier...not true. open chain and closed chain movements..big difference!


Intuitively i'd agree. Have i missed a T-Nation article on this? any other links to follow up you'd recommend?

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UkpairehMombooto
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Join date: Sep 2007
Posts: 412

Give me a break. When I equated the pushup with a squat, I;m referring to the change in recruitment and the act of moving your body in space, not the effect on the quads...its sad that that needed to be explained, but I suppose you weren't serious.
YOu are right about the effect on your wrists, but the core staboilization that arises from pushups targets the WHOLE upper body (shoulders, back, pecs, abs, lower back) and brings more muscles into play. Yes youre not gripping the bar, but that only keeps the forearms flexors out of the equation. While not at the same level as dips weighted pushups will make a significant change in your upper body once you can move a certain weight. Also changing ther pattern of motor recruitment will accelerate your strength gains in both movements.

Tulkastaldo wrote:
u_mombooto wrote:
I sincerely hope you're joking. A weighted pushup would involve a lot more stabilization.

not at all. The weighted pushup might involve core stabilization and such, much like the normal pushup, but in the bench press the weight is applied to the wrists, forcing stabilization of deltoids, pecs and triceps in order to keep the weight from crushing you.(or the weight sliding off if you're one of those people who don't use clips)

In the pushup, regardless of how much weight you use, you have a nice solid floor to push against,and your back to stabilize the weight. The stabilization comes then from the proximal end of your arms because the weight is behind you instead of in your hands. The support of the weight is more evenly distributed and therefore less intense.

While you equate the pushup with a squat, I've never felt it in my quads when doing pushups with 100 lbs. in a backpack, (unless you count the process of standing up afterwards.)


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