Building High-Performance Muscle™
Supplements and Nutrition
 
Supplements That Increase IGF-1
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BulletproofTiger
Level 3

Join date: Feb 2009
Location: California, USA
Posts: 2715

Does anyone know any ways to increase IGF-1 rather than taking IGF-1? I foudn this interesting article that says that Capsaicin and Soy Isoflavones increase it and also increase hair growth. inhumanexperiment.blogspot.com/2009/09/capsaicin-and-soy-isoflavones-grow-hair.html

I'm wondering though if the soy isoflavones increase IGF-1 at the expense of Test.

I'm looking for a supplement to take to give a boost to several different hormones like GH and LH (agmatine for both and alpha gpc for GH at least), insulin (anaconda protocol), test (heavy lifting, Rez-V, TRIBEX). Obviously Gh will convert to IGF-1 a little bit, but a direct boost would be awesome.

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BulletproofTiger
Level 3

Join date: Feb 2009
Location: California, USA
Posts: 2715

I thought this would be relevant:

Considerable evidence suggests that reduced exposure of tissue to IGF-I is associated with an extended lifespan in these species. In humans, IGF-I is linked to various age-related diseases that are limiting factors for youthful longevity. On one hand, reduced IGF-I activity is associated with significant morbidity in adulthood with an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, diabetes, osteoporosis and neurodegenerative diseases.

On the other hand, elevated IGF-I levels have been linked to cancer risk given the role of IGF in mediating normal and malignant tissue growth. Thus, IGF is clearly involved in modulating disease of aging; however, the mechanism appears to be complex and interdependent on additional modulating factors. It is attractive to hypothesize that maximal human survival depends on tight regulation of the GH-IGF axis and maintenance of optimal IGF-I action in order to prevent morbidities associated with either deficient or excessive state.

Specifically, it is possible that lower levels of IGF-I during early adulthood followed by higher levels of IGF-I later in life may be most beneficial for human longevity by addressing age-specific morbidities.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/...?_ob=ArticleURL

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HK24719
Level 3

Join date: Nov 2007
Location:
Posts: 2352

You'd be better off by training consistently to increase IGF-1.

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BulletproofTiger
Level 3

Join date: Feb 2009
Location: California, USA
Posts: 2715

Oh duh! Of course colostrum has IGF-1 in it! I knew that. The question with that though is whether it's enough in there to do anything.

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BulletproofTiger
Level 3

Join date: Feb 2009
Location: California, USA
Posts: 2715

Ran by an old Cy Wilson article on here which pointed out that colostrum did increase IGF-1 in athletes, but he also said that 5-methyl-7-methoxy-isoflavone was useful and it is not useful at all as many of us know too well.

also he said that capsaicin could be depleting glycogen stores while preserving fat stores :/

He also mentioned that coleus was a no go as was fenugreek. Both compounds are in current Biotest products, so I'm a little lost.

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BulletproofTiger
Level 3

Join date: Feb 2009
Location: California, USA
Posts: 2715

/thread

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BulletproofTiger
Level 3

Join date: Feb 2009
Location: California, USA
Posts: 2715

HK24719 wrote:
You'd be better off by training consistently to increase IGF-1.


How do you know that? To what extent does training increase IGF-1? What type of training increases IGF-1 levels the most? I read through this very well put together study titled "Resistance exercise alters MRF and IGF-I mRNA content in human skeletal muscle" http://jap.physiology.org/.../full/95/3/1038 and it did not even seem to give these answers. If you do have the answers though, please share.

It did say though that
MyoD, and MRF4 mRNA levels
MRFs are a family of skeletal muscle-specific transcription factors that regulate the expression of several skeletal muscle genes
are transiently elevated in human skeletal muscle after a single bout of heavy-resistance training, supporting the idea that the MRFs may be involved in regulating hypertrophy and/or fiber-type transitions. The results also suggest that IGF-IEa expression may be downregulated at the mRNA level during the initial part of recovery from resistance exercise.


The study didn't give much in the way of recommendations relating to training style or recovery period to optimize the hormones responsible for hypertrophy. They did give this nice little graph though which shows hormonal levels at different points in time, but it doesn't tell me much:

http://jap.physiology.org/...0932516001.jpeg

So do you have the answers I was unable to find? If so please share them.

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