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Shugart's Hammer
 
The Dreaded Spinach Binge!
1
 

Chris Shugart
Editor / V-Diet Author

Join date: Oct 2002
Location:
Posts: 16734

The Dreaded Spinach Binge!

I'm going to smack Dr. Mike Roussell right up beside his shiny dome.


Then I'm going to call him something mildly derogatory, preferably with alliteration. I'm thinking "Milkshake Mike." Then I'll dance around him and sing that song by Kelis, implying that Milkshake Mike brings all the boys to the yard.

That'll show him.

No, no, I'm kidding. Mike and I actually just co-wrote an article, an expansion of my 100 Gram Carb Cure blog. Should be a good one.

But Mike did something I found a little odd. In his part of the article, he provided a daily menu that described the foods you can eat on our 100 gram plan. I was giving the article one last edit when I noticed something: Mike had listed very specific serving sizes for the vegetables on the sample menu.

Now, Mike knows his stuff and I understand what he was doing, but then I had a thought: Are we really worried that a person who's reading a fat loss article is going to eat too many green veggies?

I'm guessing that overeating spinach isn't their problem. Oh my, we don't want a fat guy to eat too much broccoli, now do we?!


One field of spinach = one serving.

I'm being facetious, but to me at least, I think that if you're carrying around more than 20 pounds of excess adipose tissue, then the serving sizes of vegetables are the least of your worries. Heck, eat all the veggies you want. Eat pounds of spinach! It's not going to hurt you one bit, and it'll keep you full.

Fruit restrictions? Yes, those are necessary, at least at first. Our article is about the vast benefits of restricting carbs to about 100g per day, so yeah, fruit carbs can add up, as can a few "outliers": potatoes, avocados, nuts, etc.

But even then, as a diet coach, I'm not too worried. Hey, if an overweight person is reaching for an apple and not a candy bar or a drive-through burrito, then that's a win, regardless of the carb count of an apple.

Sure, sure, as the educated dieticians will tell you, you can technically get fat on too many calories of any food since "a calorie is a calorie." But I just don't see people getting fat on apples and spinach here on Planet Reality (which, in case you didn't know, is in a completely different galaxy than Planet Dietician.)


Planet Dietician?

I often get emails from people who've "fallen off the V-Diet wagon." They shamefully admit that they went monkey-nuts crazy and ate a bunch of chicken breasts and a pile of celery.

Now, true, that's not part of the strict 28-day, mostly-liquid portion of the diet plan, but if overeating chicken and veggies has become a "cheat" to the person... yep, another check in the win column.

Anyway, Mike and I hope you learn a lot from our upcoming article. Mike has a ton to offer as a rising nutrition guru and I'm looking forward to working with him more... even if I did edit out his vegetable serving sizes. -- Chris


PS: Rants (and more) in 140 characters or less. Follow me on Twitter.

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corstijeir
Level 100

Join date: Mar 2010
Location: Tennessee, USA
Posts: 3311

Exactly.

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Mike Roussell, PhD
Contributor

Join date: Dec 2004
Location: Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 519

hahahahha....

I'm analytical...guilty as charged.

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barn-e
Level 5

Join date: Mar 2003
Location: Florida, USA
Posts: 116

Strict amounts of veggies? One of my goals is to eat ridiculous amounts of vegetables. That's right, my measurement unit is "ridiculous". I'm still not there yet.

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MikeManos
Level

Join date: Feb 2008
Location:
Posts: 127

Love the spinach and love the Hammer first thing in the morning. Nothing like a spinach omelet and a bit of dietary wisdom with my first cup of Costa Rican java. :)

And I couldn't agree more on overweight people not needing to worry about eating too many green veggies, be it spinach or anything else organic and full of vitamins/antioxidants. At least it lays the groundwork for healthier habits going forward, much like your V-Diet does.

I remember having a discussion of this sort with one of my sister's "larger" in-laws, and it definitely confirmed a former AH-HA moment for me: It's kind of hard to eat too many calories in the first place when you do ditch the sugary & processed crap, so how big of a problem are veggies (and to a certain extent fruit) when compared to this food-like stuff? Not much.

To illustrate this point, I told this large woman what I typically eat for breakfast: 3-4 whole eggs (over easy), 1 chicken sausage link, 1 steamed Yukon Gold potato (sometimes), 2 servings of green peas and 1 serving of fruit (usually fresh & in season). Her response, "I can't eat all that in the morning! That's too much food!"

Yet I was lean & mean and she was morbidly obese. Go figure.

BTW, come to find out her typical morning breakfast was (cough cough) LIGHT by comparison: A toasted bagel with butter and strawberry flavored cream cheese, with either a coffee (cream & sugar no doubt, though I didn't ask) and/or a fruit smoothie. And of course, she was "hungry" not too long afterwards.

So obviously, I informed her that she actually ate MORE than I did calorie wise...it just didn't feel like it because it was - for the most part - calorie-dense CRAP. Which proves the former point: If she had to eat THAT many calories, and this type of food wasn't available, she would have a hard time eating that much because real food is just "volumetrically" too filling. (And this was only her breakfast.)

Just another one of life's subtle lessons. :)

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Chris Shugart
Editor / V-Diet Author

Join date: Oct 2002
Location:
Posts: 16734

barn-e wrote:
Strict amounts of veggies? One of my goals is to eat ridiculous amounts of vegetables. That's right, my measurement unit is "ridiculous". I'm still not there yet.


I've often thought that when I get around to writing a cookbook I'm going to use measurement units like "assloads" and "ridiculous."

"Add an assload of rutabaga and top with a ridiculous amount of cinnamon. If feeding more than two people, bump that up to a shit-ton."

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Chris Shugart
Editor / V-Diet Author

Join date: Oct 2002
Location:
Posts: 16734

MikeManos wrote:
Love the spinach and love the Hammer first thing in the morning. Nothing like a spinach omelet and a bit of dietary wisdom with my first cup of Costa Rican java. :)

And I couldn't agree more on overweight people not needing to worry about eating too many green veggies, be it spinach or anything else organic and full of vitamins/antioxidants. At least it lays the groundwork for healthier habits going forward, much like your V-Diet does.

I remember having a discussion of this sort with one of my sister's "larger" in-laws, and it definitely confirmed a former AH-HA moment for me: It's kind of hard to eat too many calories in the first place when you do ditch the sugary & processed crap, so how big of a problem are veggies (and to a certain extent fruit) when compared to this food-like stuff? Not much.

To illustrate this point, I told this large woman what I typically eat for breakfast: 3-4 whole eggs (over easy), 1 chicken sausage link, 1 steamed Yukon Gold potato (sometimes), 2 servings of green peas and 1 serving of fruit (usually fresh & in season). Her response, "I can't eat all that in the morning! That's too much food!"

Yet I was lean & mean and she was morbidly obese. Go figure.

BTW, come to find out her typical morning breakfast was (cough cough) LIGHT by comparison: A toasted bagel with butter and strawberry flavored cream cheese, with either a coffee (cream & sugar no doubt, though I didn't ask) and/or a fruit smoothie. And of course, she was "hungry" not too long afterwards.

So obviously, I informed her that she actually ate MORE than I did calorie wise...it just didn't feel like it because it was - for the most part - calorie-dense CRAP. Which proves the former point: If she had to eat THAT many calories, and this type of food wasn't available, she would have a hard time eating that much because real food is just "volumetrically" too filling. (And this was only her breakfast.)

Just another one of life's subtle lessons. :)



Good points, Mike.

It would be truly difficult to get fat if people would just cut the sugar and starchy/grainy carbs. Wave a magic wand and make that happen and the obesity rate would plummet while every major "disease of civilization" would return to rarity status... and it would happen without a single person counting a calorie.




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sarguy
Level 1

Join date: Jul 2008
Location: Idaho, USA
Posts: 31

Chris Shugart wrote:
barn-e wrote:
Strict amounts of veggies? One of my goals is to eat ridiculous amounts of vegetables. That's right, my measurement unit is "ridiculous". I'm still not there yet.


I've often thought that when I get around to writing a cookbook I'm going to use measurement units like "assloads" and "ridiculous."

"Add an assload of rutabaga and top with a ridiculous amount of cinnamon. If feeding more than two people, bump that up to a shit-ton."


I'll take two copies.

"...cook the dish at 723 Kelvin for about as long as it takes to do a V-burn Challenge. Get moving, or your shit-ton of rutabagas and cinnamon will be burnt to a crisp and taste like ass."

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mtwelve51
Level 3

Join date: Apr 2010
Location: Maine, USA
Posts: 42

When can we expect this article, Chris?

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Chris Shugart
Editor / V-Diet Author

Join date: Oct 2002
Location:
Posts: 16734

mtwelve51 wrote:
When can we expect this article, Chris?


We're all finished with it on our end. The big boss decides when (and if) to publish.

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jskrabac
Level 4

Join date: May 2010
Location: California, USA
Posts: 3962

Well, we've all seen what the spinach binge does for Pop-eye.

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Oregand
Level

Join date: Oct 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 1120

Well it wasnt a spinage binge but it sure was a binge:p

3KG of brussel sprouts, holy crap was I hungry so I just kept piling on the greens.

I havent had a break in my diet in last last month but something just snapped tonight and i couldn't put down the steamer.

So many tiny cabbages lost to the black hole that is my appetite.

And then, well then I luled.

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badbrass
Level 1

Join date: Aug 2007
Location:
Posts: 20

Chris Shugart wrote:
I've often thought that when I get around to writing a cookbook I'm going to use measurement units like "assloads" and "ridiculous."

"Add an assload of rutabaga and top with a ridiculous amount of cinnamon. If feeding more than two people, bump that up to a shit-ton."


Hmm. Gets the point across, alright. Not exactly what I'd like to
see in cookbook, though. For this morning's prayer breakfast at my
church, I fixed a huge omlette: 3 doz eggs, a large onion, 4 roma
tomatoes, a pound of sliced mushrooms, handfulls of baby
spinich, several cups of shredded cheese. And cooked and served a
whole ham. For about 20 guys. Yum. Didn't have any left over.

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ftmmichael
Level

Join date: Jul 2010
Location:
Posts: 8

I think I need to go on a spinach binge, my forearms suck

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CappedAndPlanIt
Level 2

Join date: Jul 2006
Location:
Posts: 3406

Chris Shugart wrote:
MikeManos wrote:
Love the spinach and love the Hammer first thing in the morning. Nothing like a spinach omelet and a bit of dietary wisdom with my first cup of Costa Rican java. :)

And I couldn't agree more on overweight people not needing to worry about eating too many green veggies, be it spinach or anything else organic and full of vitamins/antioxidants. At least it lays the groundwork for healthier habits going forward, much like your V-Diet does.

I remember having a discussion of this sort with one of my sister's "larger" in-laws, and it definitely confirmed a former AH-HA moment for me: It's kind of hard to eat too many calories in the first place when you do ditch the sugary & processed crap, so how big of a problem are veggies (and to a certain extent fruit) when compared to this food-like stuff? Not much.

To illustrate this point, I told this large woman what I typically eat for breakfast: 3-4 whole eggs (over easy), 1 chicken sausage link, 1 steamed Yukon Gold potato (sometimes), 2 servings of green peas and 1 serving of fruit (usually fresh & in season). Her response, "I can't eat all that in the morning! That's too much food!"

Yet I was lean & mean and she was morbidly obese. Go figure.

BTW, come to find out her typical morning breakfast was (cough cough) LIGHT by comparison: A toasted bagel with butter and strawberry flavored cream cheese, with either a coffee (cream & sugar no doubt, though I didn't ask) and/or a fruit smoothie. And of course, she was "hungry" not too long afterwards.

So obviously, I informed her that she actually ate MORE than I did calorie wise...it just didn't feel like it because it was - for the most part - calorie-dense CRAP. Which proves the former point: If she had to eat THAT many calories, and this type of food wasn't available, she would have a hard time eating that much because real food is just "volumetrically" too filling. (And this was only her breakfast.)

Just another one of life's subtle lessons. :)



Good points, Mike.

It would be truly difficult to get fat if people would just cut the sugar and starchy/grainy carbs. Wave a magic wand and make that happen and the obesity rate would plummet while every major "disease of civilization" would return to rarity status... and it would happen without a single person counting a calorie.







I couldn't agree more. This is something I've been grappling with for a while - to be healthy in America, you have to do things that you shouldn't have to do.

(I can hear it now? "Gasp! How dare you say you shouldnt have to do something to get a result! Its the entitlement mentality bullshit again!")

But, its really not. Think about it: if we didn't have nutritionally vapid, calorie dense food EVERYWHERE, ALL the time, being constantly advertised to us and dominating every menu we look at and store we shop in, we wouldnt need to count calories. We could just fucking eat, and our bodies would tell us to stop when we were satisfied.

If we didn't have a society built around automobiles and other similar forms of transportation, and surrounded by labor-saving devices and sedentary jobs/entertainment, we wouldnt need to make a point to exercise just to not get fat and die. Yes, looking really good would still take work, but even the people who didn't have fitness/health/lookin good nekkid as a priority would still be healthy.

I'm certainly not saying people shouldn't watch what they eat and make a point to exercise - especially in America, they have to. We're "fitness nuts" because we absolutely have to be, we relax a little and its hello love handles. I'm just saying I'm not shocked at all that so many people are overweight and (flame away here) I really don't blame them.

I think of it like this: for me, my computer isnt a major concern or hobby. I turn it on, use the internet, save files, write papers - really basic stuff. I dont know much about clockspeed or partitians or programming languages or anything like that. I'm not a computer guy. And the majority of people who own computers aren't going to be "computer people" in that sense. So computers should be designed in a way that I don't have to know how to reformat the harddrive to keep it from wiping everything randomly.

I'm not a car person. Most people aren't. Cars should be designed so that only minimal, basic care is needed. Not so that they'll break down every 20,000 miles if you dont get a full tuneup and fluid change.

If cars or computers were designed (specifically) to break down if the owner didn't put excessive effort into maintaining it, would you blame them for having broken down cars and computers? If not, why blame them when their bodies are broken down by a society specifically designed to cause it?

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