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Shugart's Hammer
 
The 100 Gram Carb Cure
 

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Chris Shugart wrote:The argument then would be that certain things aren't "diets." A diet implies that you'll eat that way for a while, lose fat, then stop the diet and begin eating another way, probably the same way you ate before or close to it.


A diet doesn't imply that, popular culture and society implies that. The word 'diet' is a derivative of the greek word 'diaita' which means 'a way of life' so I'm thinking of the more traditional sense of diet as in 'what you eat' rather than the modern 'I'm going on a diet' style meaning, but yes many people do take it to mean the way you said. I was just saying that various 'ways of eating' different to how people naturally eat don't change people's long term behaviour 95% of the time, they almost always revert back.

Choosing to get rid of junk carbs or even cut out all grains or milk isn't a "diet" in that sense. It's a lifestyle (I've never liked that word honestly). It's like choosing not smoke. I'm not on a tobacco diet; I'm just choosing not to stick that stuff into my body because it has harmful effects.


I guess it's just semantics. Some people are going to go 'paleo' for a month before a school reunion to drop 10lbs, then go back to how they were eating, others are going to stick with ornish or pritkins for the rest of their life and see how they eat as a way of life.

So, one person chooses to get rid of most refined sugar in their diets and not eat bread anymore. They lose fat. Second person does Weight Watchers where you're allowed sugar and bread, just in smaller amounts. They lose fat too.

But person #2 is starving and getting crazy hormone and blood sugar fluctuations from the foods she chooses. Chances of failure are very high. (Only 2 in 2000 keep their weight off after 5 years according to Weight Watchers own stats.) Meanwhile, the person who just decided not to eat bread anymore is still reaping those benefits and not battling hunger and crazy cravings. Why? Because choosing better foods isn't a "diet" really, even if it leads to fat loss.

Sorry, just thinking aloud here...



As I said, plenty of people use paleo as a short term diet, and some do use WW as a long term lifestyle way of eating. Do you happen to have the stats on how many paleo people keep the weight off after 5 years? Again, otherwise it's just a comment on human behaviour rather than a particular diet. For many people, not eating grains and dairy is both unaffordable, impractical and will just make them crave those items relentlessly, to fall off the bandwagon, outweighing the benefits of stable blood sugar or what have you. There's also a lot of middle ground between WW and paleo, such as a high protein, moderate carb and moderate fat approach.

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mtwelve51
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Join date: Apr 2010
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So basically 100 carbs:

1. Metabolic Drive carbs
2. Peanut/Almond Butter/Nuts/Seeds carbs
3. Starchier veggies (not potatoes), green veggies if you feel like being complete
4. Cream in coffee (for me)
5. Para-workout Surge, etc.
6. Fill out the rest with a fruit

I think I'm just going to stick to this rule, only 100 g carbs.

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Chris Shugart
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mtwelve51 wrote:
So basically 100 carbs:

1. Metabolic Drive carbs
2. Peanut/Almond Butter/Nuts/Seeds carbs
3. Starchier veggies (not potatoes), green veggies if you feel like being complete
4. Cream in coffee (for me)
5. Para-workout Surge, etc.
6. Fill out the rest with a fruit

I think I'm just going to stick to this rule, only 100 g carbs.




Yep. And of course if a lot of those carbs are from green leafy veggies or natural high fiber foods, then it's no big deal going over by 10 or 15. Even 150g daily would be doable for long-term.

Today is Thanksgiving day and I'll be well under 150g carbs. And a big chunk of that came from a FINiBAR (41g) that I ate pre-5k race at 8 this morning.

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xoxonikkixoxo
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You mentioned dropping milk, how do you feel about other products like low fat yogurt, and cottage cheese?

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xXSeraphimXx
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Chris Shugart wrote:
MikeManos wrote:
Just want to chime in and say that the T-Dawg diet (from many moons ago) was my first step into the low carb realm & diet process, and it very worked - and still does - for that explicit purpose. And if I remember correctly, that diet dictated about 70 grams of carbs on nonweight training days and 100 grams on training days. Right from the gate I could tell that these amounts were all I needed to drop fat and maintain/build muscle.



Yep, I think that old diet plan TC and I came up with was the first to formally introduce the 100g idea.

That plan came from a simple idea I had that worked very well for me: I'd played around with the Anabolic Diet which allowed 30g carbs per weekday. But that plan didn't allow for peri-workout nutrition, and skipping that is just nuts.

So my idea was to basically do a low-carb diet that didn't neglect peri-workout drinks. And I still like that general idea: keep most carbs around the training period with low-ish carbs from protein shakes and solid foods the rest of the day.

And for a clean mass phase, I really don't see a need to go too much over this, maybe up to 150g carbs per day but still keeping a big chunk of those to the peri/para-workout period: Anaconda Protocol, etc.





That was the first diet I used years ago. It should honestly be put back up,It is easy to follow and works like a charm.

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Chris Shugart
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xoxonikkixoxo wrote:
You mentioned dropping milk, how do you feel about other products like low fat yogurt, and cottage cheese?


A little natural Greek yogurt is fine. Just don't get it if they've added tons of sugar and other junk. It's tough to find non-messed-with-yogurt these days.

With most forms of cheese, the milk sugars have been removed while making it. Which is why cheese is fine for the most part and milk isn't. (Cheese can be calorically dense though, even if it's carb-free or mostly so, so it's not a "free food"; you still have to keep an eye on it.)

Cottage cheese is personally tricky for me. It's not awful, but I notice a lot of bloat from it. And it just seems like it's harder to stay lean with cottage cheese in my diet. I'd put it into the "every once in a while" category.

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booty_in_lulu
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100g of carbs/day.... is this specific to males? if so, what would you recommend for females?

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Chris Shugart
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booty_in_lulu wrote:
100g of carbs/day.... is this specific to males? if so, what would you recommend for females?



100g is a good ballpark figure for males and females, no worries.

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alamctrusty
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Is raw milk any better?

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Chris Shugart
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alamctrusty wrote:
Is raw milk any better?


I don't use it, but I do think it's better in many ways than regular. But it also has many of the same drawbacks. Again, not sure how consuming the infant formula of another species ever became a "staple" of the human diet. And with almond milk, who needs cow juice?

I'd use raw butter products if they were more widely available. The butter and cheese making process seems to zap a lot of sugar/carbs.

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xoxonikkixoxo
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I Eat a lot of cottage cheese but I don't notice a bloat really, I was beginning to wonder if it was messing up my fatloss goals...something to consider I guess. Its just easy for breakfast, I'm getting tired of eggs...

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Tenacious Tones
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Hey Chris. I love the 100 carb cure. I, myself, find that it's the perfect ratio for losing fat. My question though is concerning my workout and energy. I can't seem to find the energy to power through my heavy workouts with just 100 carbs. Both my strength and endurance suffer.

I have tried uping the carbs a day or two out of the week but it cuts into my fatloss progress. I just worry that if I am not lifting those heavy weights and getting through my workouts that I may be losing muscle mass. Any suggestions?

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Chris Shugart
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Tenacious Tones wrote:
Hey Chris. I love the 100 carb cure. I, myself, find that it's the perfect ratio for losing fat. My question though is concerning my workout and energy. I can't seem to find the energy to power through my heavy workouts with just 100 carbs. Both my strength and endurance suffer.

I have tried uping the carbs a day or two out of the week but it cuts into my fatloss progress. I just worry that if I am not lifting those heavy weights and getting through my workouts that I may be losing muscle mass. Any suggestions?



Are you using good peri-workout nutrition? If not, then there's your likely answer.

But the truth is, the human body doesn't need as many carbs for "energy" as people have been lead to believe.

But let's also look at this from a more holistic viewpoint. The average person doesn't get enough sleep. Most people walk around deprived but never attribute how they feel to their chronic lack of sleep. When inadequately rested, we often reach for carbs (not that they really help much.) Or we attribute our lack of physical and mental energy to "lack of carbs" or something else. Nope, it's usually lack of sleep.

Just some ideas!

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n8tive
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Definetly changing my peri-workout routine has made the biggest difference. I used to feel sluggish and blah all the time, but a simple change of peri & post workout nutrition is what made the BIGGEST difference for me.

Just my experience and .02. Btw I am a V-Diet vet that now follows the nutrition guidelines that Shugs lines out.

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Tenacious Tones
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Thanks for the info. I have always taken in good nutrition pre/post workout as well as taking some other supplements. I just don't have the strength and endurance I am used to without the carbs being up around 250 for a couple days before my workout. I would love to blame it on the lowered calories as result of the lowered carbs! But I am not so sure. I'm thinking maybe the amount of volume should be reduced as to maintaine intensity levels on lifts while dieting. Sleep is an excellent point as I do notice it effects everything in the gym! Great point.

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burder
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Hey Chris - how many grams of fats would you suggest while on the 100g carb cure? Is there a range that you'd shoot for? Thanks.

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Chris Shugart
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burder wrote:
Hey Chris - how many grams of fats would you suggest while on the 100g carb cure? Is there a range that you'd shoot for? Thanks.



Here's the way I've always done it: 1) Stick to around 100g of carbs per day most of the time. 2) Shoot for around a gram (at least) of protein per pound of body weight (assuming 40% of the person isn't body fat and he weighs 400). 3) After that, get your healthy fats when cooking (coconut oil), have some omega-3 eggs, use good olive oil on salad, take your fish oil, have some walnuts, and don't sweat the details. I've just never bothered counting fat grams.... except when I was fat and trying a low-fat, high-carb diet. (Fail.)

Odd, I know, but I don't want people to live their lives spending more time doing ratios on the calculator more than they read ingredients lists and learning to prepare tasty, physique-supportive meals.

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Tirith
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It takes a little while to let go of the anti-fat mentality, even after switching to adequate-carb. It's programmed in so hard that even if one eats fat, I'd bet a lot of people are still minimizing saturated as a source because deep down they still believe it's bad. It was that way for me.

When I truly cleaned things up and adopted Green/Faces + Fish oil, I couldn't get to 100g of carbs without a piece of fruit. I also couldn't naturally get to enough calories without chugging olive oil because I was still sticking to super lean beef, chicken breasts, turkey breasts, and center-cut ham.

Once I started mixing it up a bit more and buying a few chicken thighs and some bacon, it got a lot easier to reach calories without chugging olive oil. It just started making more sense, and other than considering grass fed, organic, and conventional, I don't worry about fat content of the meat.

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Weevo
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Hey Chris, I wonder, just how detailed are you when counting the carbs? For example, one cup of blueberries has around 18g CHO, 6 of which come from fiber. When you count to 100g for the day, does that include fiber? So when moving toward 100, would you count that cup of blueberries as 18g or 12g?

Also, do you count the carbs in fibrous veggies, even if it's only a few per cup? I often times have a good 10 cups of veggies per day, so that could be around 40 or 50g right there.

Then we have misc stuff like coconut flour, which is about 16g per two tablespoons, about 10 of which are from fiber.

What I did for a while after the V-Diet was count the carbs from peri-workout nutrition (Surge), and from fruits. Everything else, like the few I'd get from greek yogurt or a serving of nuts, I wouldn't worry about. Should I be counting those if I really want to get that 100g mark?

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Chris Shugart
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Weevo wrote:
Hey Chris, I wonder, just how detailed are you when counting the carbs? For example, one cup of blueberries has around 18g CHO, 6 of which come from fiber. When you count to 100g for the day, does that include fiber? So when moving toward 100, would you count that cup of blueberries as 18g or 12g?

Also, do you count the carbs in fibrous veggies, even if it's only a few per cup? I often times have a good 10 cups of veggies per day, so that could be around 40 or 50g right there.

Then we have misc stuff like coconut flour, which is about 16g per two tablespoons, about 10 of which are from fiber.

What I did for a while after the V-Diet was count the carbs from peri-workout nutrition (Surge), and from fruits. Everything else, like the few I'd get from greek yogurt or a serving of nuts, I wouldn't worry about. Should I be counting those if I really want to get that 100g mark?


This blog just became an article:

http://www.t-nation.com/..._gram_carb_cure

and I just answered that in the discussion area. Here ya go:

"As for counting fiber-derived carbs, here's the thing: I suggest counting all carbs, even if it's the fiber in a avocado. Those types of carbs certainly won't hurt you, but counting everything just simplifies things. Now, if you end up at, say, 130g of carbs per day, but you know that many of those came from green leafy "fibery" things, then you simply don't sweat it. In reality, your net carbs were around 100 anyway. Counting everything, until you get the hang of what 100g "looks like", just makes it simple. And this plan is all about simple."

And I'd add that if it's fiber from coconut flour or almond flour, then no, I wouldn't sweat those carbs either.

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AmericanOutlaw13
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Man it is so freaking hard to cut carbs on a vegetarian diet. I can get any of the low carb protein sources like chicken and fish, and its tough to eat like 8-10 eggs a day.

Any advice you got for a vegetarian trying to follow the 100g carb plan?

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Chris Shugart
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AmericanOutlaw13 wrote:
Man it is so freaking hard to cut carbs on a vegetarian diet. I can get any of the low carb protein sources like chicken and fish, and its tough to eat like 8-10 eggs a day.

Any advice you got for a vegetarian trying to follow the 100g carb plan?


Not really. Vegetarian (no-soy) protein powder perhaps?

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Chrispy61
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Sorry if this has been answered already and ive read past it but when looking to hit 100gs of carbs per day what should you be aiming for over all calories wise? Would it be 500cals under maintainence?

So you work out the cals from the 100g of carb, then based on bodyweight work out the protein then make up the rest in fats?

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Chris Shugart
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Chrispy61 wrote:
Sorry if this has been answered already and ive read past it but when looking to hit 100gs of carbs per day what should you be aiming for over all calories wise? Would it be 500cals under maintainence?

So you work out the cals from the 100g of carb, then based on bodyweight work out the protein then make up the rest in fats?




Here's the full article that came from this blog that has a sample menu:

http://www.t-nation.com/..._gram_carb_cure

Still, it's not about calorie counting; it's about auto-regulating. Most people can do that by only watching carbs.

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Chrispy61
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So in short, eat normal portions of fat and proteins but keep carbs 100g? Should you be aiming for 1g of protein per lb of lean bodyweight?

Thanks for the link to the article, i seen it ages ago and bookmarked it but lost a bunch of stuff on my old PC!!

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