Building High-Performance Muscle™
Shugart's Hammer
 
Running Makes You Fat
 

Velvet Elvis
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Join date: Jul 2013
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Posts: 223

NikH wrote:
Dean Karnazes - completed 50 Marathons in 50 Consecutive Days, is doing it wrong.


I don't think picking out the one genetic outlier who actually trains that way, and has a little bit of muscle, is a good example of what ├╝ber long cardio sessions can accomplish.

He's in great shape, and actually has a build for a long distance runner (kind of) ..... But I don't think 99% of the population would see the same results trying to emulate his training

There is always the exception to the rule .....

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theBeth
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Join date: May 2013
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NikH wrote:
theBeth wrote:
The human body was designed to sprint ( hunting prey, or running from predators), or walk long distances (foraging/farming). My motto is "Sprinting builds muscle, walking conserves muscle, and running eats muscle."


Actually the human body was designed to run long distances.

Comparing to leopards: they dash faster than we do, but also run on four legs which uses more energy, they can only exhale each time they bring their legs together when running.

We run on two legs, have a ventilation system that is independent to movement, no fur, and a lot of sweat glands, that is very good for heat management. African tribes have succeeded in hunting antilopes by merely exhausting them in the day heat, by running after them, without using weapons. Leopards succeed in this by outrunning the slow ones.

If we would be designed to be muscular, our natural diet would be bigger, and our muscle gains would be easier. Compare to a zoo gorilla that maintains its muscle by sitting in a cage eating 18kg (40lbs) vegetation per day, not doing a single weighted squat...



maybe I should have separated those two statements so as not to confuse. I think the primal development of the human body is up for debate but in relevance to training my motto is pretty solid.

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infinite_shore
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Join date: Jul 2012
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The data does not warrant such a conclusion. I also think the often used marathon runner vs sprinter body comparison doesn't make much sense in this context.

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Typhoon
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Join date: Jun 2005
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Posts: 392

infinite_shore wrote:
The data does not warrant such a conclusion. I also think the often used marathon runner vs sprinter body comparison doesn't make much sense in this context.


This never made sense to me either. It's akin to saying playing Basketball will make you taller or gymnastics shorter, no it's that the higher you go in the sport the more you'll see certain body types more and more often. For sprinters that's a lean individual with a lot of fast twitch muscle, for endurance athletes it's people with ridiculous VO2 and oxygen carrying capacities.

I like Beth's motto for training though.

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midnitelamp
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Join date: May 2013
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Posts: 10

don't boxers do a lot of roadwork? I "heard" that Joe Louis carried knucle pins from rail road cars that weighed 8 lbs a piece. also decathalon competitors seem well balanced.

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WhiteSturgeon
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Join date: Jul 2013
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Interesting article! Why would running cause increased anxiety and cortisol levels? I was actually just reading an article in AJP where research is showing a correlation between increased physical exercise (they referenced walking and jogging) and decreased symptoms of anxiety and depression.

I do mostly circuit training with a little cardio thrown in the mix. Personally, I've found that any form of physical activity significantly diminishes my level of stress.

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BrokenBad
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Join date: Nov 2004
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Posts: 211

Couldn't agree more. Good article.

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Fletch1986
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Join date: Aug 2007
Location: Texas, USA
Posts: 4677

So if you have to run for distance, what's the best way to mitigate the negative effects? I need to work up to a sub 16 minute 2 miles. An 8 minute single mile would leave me huffing and puffing and about to puke at the moment.

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magick
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Join date: Aug 2012
Location: California, USA
Posts: 1045

Fletch1986 wrote:
So if you have to run for distance, what's the best way to mitigate the negative effects? I need to work up to a sub 16 minute 2 miles. An 8 minute single mile would leave me huffing and puffing and about to puke at the moment.


Don't think 2 miles counts as long distance.

Like others have said, boxers do road work. They run for miles.

But the key appears to be that boxers didn't just jog passively; they ran. Or they alternated between running and jogging and doing a whole bunch of other stuff.

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midnitelamp
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Join date: May 2013
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fletch,these are just some observations offered in loose association style.

running and lunges are related. hills are hidden speedwork, but be careful as overuse injuries are easy to do.

many large football players have ran sub six minute miles many decathalon runners have broke five and a former world record holder weighed 175 lbs. in other words lose any flab but you don't have to be anorexic to run two in 16 minutes.

there are loads of books,but The Self Coached Runner by Allan Lawrence and Mark Scheid has been described to me as too hard by some very successful runners so it is probably just right.

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NickJ83improve
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Join date: Sep 2013
Location: England
Posts: 17

I run regularly and need to training for ironman. This is I guess my chosen sport, something about pushing my limits makes me tick I guess. I also am aware of my body composition and keep a check. I know after my ironman and ultramarathon which I completed within 4 weeks of each other had left me higher in body fat although my weight pretty much stayed unchanged baring the last few weeks after picking up some bad habits. For me this means I just need to do more strength training, build some more lean mass and drop some fat.

I think for the general guy/girl in the gym an ironman athlete is someone to look up to if say bodybuilding and magazine front cover models aren't your look. The top athletes train with weights regularly and it counteracts the damage done by long steady state cardio and keeps them looking athletic. I know some people would settle for that as a look they desire.

I use weight training with all my clients even if their goal is to run their first or fastest 10k. One of my clients ran her fastest 10k on minimal running and plenty of heavy lifting. When they ask me what the weight training is for I explain it's injury prevention and prevents muscle deterioration. It also makes you stronger as a bonus.

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timoth1
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Join date: Jan 2012
Location: Maryland, USA
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I'm not sure what study you read Chris. For anyone interested in actual data the article is here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...les/PMC2864590/

Smallmike's quote from the study's conclusion contradicts your interpretation, as does the first figure in the study which clearly shows that waist circumference decreases with increased weekly mileage.

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Quinnrose
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Join date: Jan 2013
Location: Washington, USA
Posts: 3

I too am both a runner and a lifter. I have had a pretty low bodyfat for years and a decent squat (385lbs @ 175bw) I have done 50 mile ultras and half a dozen marathons (PR 3:40). I also hate the argument Crossfitters make which is that some top level marathoners can't box jump on a 12 inch box. I can do a 51 inch box jump just fine.

I think the higher weekly mileage makes it hard to keep on tons of muscle, but it is mostly from calories in calories out. If you have a high weekly mileage and big muscles, then it is easy to get injured from the weight you are bearing and you have to eat tons and tons just to keep weight. Also, running makes you hungry for carbs and overeating carbs can help your performance, but also leads to holding water weight and midsection fat. I don't have serious competition lift numbers or competition marathon times, but damn I love to do both.

My physique is nothing like a bodybuilder's, but I have had sub 10% bf for years. I rarely have high mileage weeks and I almost never do grinding junk miles. I do 800 repeats at the track, a weekly long run, and mix it up with a lot of hills during tempo runs. Most of all, the thrilling exhaustion and sense of accomplishment of finishing an ultra is, to me, so much better than any PR in weightlifting, but I like being strong too, so I make that a priority as well.

I think people did running for conditioning for years until a few articles got them scared of it. Sure, doing hundred mile weeks for months on end is dangerous and wearing down of the body, but that doesn't mean lacing up and putting in an afternoon here and there will bloat you and atrophy your legs... it really won't.

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